The Saint John’s Bible Gallery Now Open

The Saint John’s Bible is now publicly on display in a dedicated gallery located on the lower level of Alcuin Library on the Saint John’s University Campus. The gallery has free admission and features 28 original folios showcasing works from all seven volumes of the Bible. There are also other rare books and manuscripts from the Hill Museum & Manuscript Library collections on display to complement the exhibition of the folios. Tools, materials and sketches used in the production of The Saint John’s Bible give an insight in to the processes used to create this colossal work of faith and art, as well as an interactive video player, created by Armadillo, which allows you to meet the team behind the project.

Find out more about our work on The Saint John’s Bible project here.

The Saint John's Bible Gallery, Hill Museum & Manuscript Library, Saint John's University, Minnesota, USA
The Saint John’s Bible Gallery (photo credit Wayne Torborg, 2017, Hill Museum & Manuscript Library, Saint John’s University, Collegeville, Minnesota, USA)
Saint John's Bible Turning the Pages 4K
Saint John’s Bible Turning the Pages 4K (photo credit Wayne Torborg, 2017, Hill Museum & Manuscript Library, Saint John’s University, Collegeville, Minnesota, USA)

Natural History Museum: Herbarium

For the launch of the Natural History Museum’s spectacular new Darwin Centre, Armadillo were delighted to produce a Turning the Pages Gallery version of a Herbarium, taken from the NHM’s archives. As the Darwin Centre is focused on research in to the diversity of life on Earth we, rather fittingly, produced a Turning the Pages in which the pages come to life! Have a look at the video below, or visit the book at the Darwin Centre if you are able, can you spot the living things on each spread?

National Trust: The Sarum Missal

In 1487 William Caxton printed his first two-colour book – the Sarum Missal, a Catholic version of the mass for the Legh family, owners of Lyme Park, Cheshire. It’s an astonishing book, full of detail about the period, and it’s finally been put on display at Lyme Park using Turning the Pages. Happily, it’s back in it’s original home and visitors can now explore the last surviving pre-reformation Catholic missal – virtually.